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1. Cancertame Ayurvedic Formulation
2. What is Chemotherapy?
3. What is Radiotherapy?
4. Role of Ayurveda in Cancer Treatment
5. Genesis of Cancer
6. Early Detection of Cancer
7. Diet, Nutrition & Cancer
8. Tobacco Smoking & Cancer
9. Conventional Treatment of Cancer
10. Soft Tissue Sarcoma
11. Mesothelioma
12. Skin Cancer
13. Bone Cancer
14. Leukaemia
15. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL)
16. Chronic Myelogenous Leukaemia (CML)
17. Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia (ALL) & Acute Non-Lymphocytic Leukaemias (ANLL)
18. Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia (AML)
19. Lymphoma
20. Multiple Myeloma
21. Breast Cancer
22. Prostate Cancer
23. Oral Cancer (Carcinoma of the Cheek, Lips & Tongue)
24. Carcinoma of the Salivary Gland
25. Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus
26. Carcinoma of Pharynx (Oropharynx, Nasopharynx and Hypopharynx)
27. Carcinoma of the Larynx
28. Brain & Spinal Cord Tumours
29. Primary Tumours of the Brain
30. Metastases in the Brain
31. Carcinoma of the Oesophagus
32. Thyroid Cancer
33. Bronchogenic Carcinoma (Lung Cancer)
34. Secondary Cancers of the Lung
35. Carcinoma of the Stomach
36. Liver Cancer
37. Gallbladder & Biliary Tract Cancer
38. Pancreatic Cancer
39. Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma and Nephroblastoma)
40. Urinary Tract (Transitional Cell Carcinoma) & Bladder Cancer
41. Carcinoma of Colon & Rectum
42. Primary Tumours of the Testis
43. Ovarian Cancer (Stromal, Germ Cell and Krukenberg's Tumour)
44. Carcinoma of Uterus
45. Cervix Cancer
46. Paediatric Cancers
47. AIDS Related Cancers
48. Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Site (CUPS)
49. Role of Nutrition in Cancer Treatment
50. Chinese Medicine in Cancer Treatment
Leukaemia


It is commonly thought that leukaemia is a cancer of the blood, but in fact, leukaemia is a cancer of the blood-forming organs including the bone marrow and the lymph system. To be precise, leukaemia is a cancer of the blood-forming cells known as haematopoietic stem cells. Leukaemia is characterised by diffuse replacement of the bone marrow by the malignant cells known as the leukaemic cells. The leukaemic cells spill over into the peripheral blood and may infiltrate the liver, spleen, lymph nodes and some other tissues of the body.


The red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and the lymph cells originate in the bone marrow and lymph system, where they get matured, before entering the bloodstream.


The exact cause of leukaemia is not fully understood but exposure to ionising radiation, cytotoxic drugs (particularly alkylating agents) and benzene are considered as the major risk factors. Human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is known to cause the adult T-cell leukaemia. Similarly, some other viruses are suspected as a causative factor of leukaemia. Immunological deficiency and genetic factors also play an important role in genesis of the leukaemia.


Leukaemia is a progressive and fatal disease. The course of leukaemia varies from a few weeks to several years. Leukaemia usually presents with symptoms of weakness, lethargy, fever, bone pain, joint pain and flu-like symptoms. There may be lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, recurrent infections, bleeding tendencies and bone tenderness. The cause of death in leukaemic patients is usually anaemia, haemorrhage or intermittent infections.


On the basis of clinical behaviour, leukaemias can be divided into two types, i.e. acute leukaemias and chronic leukaemias. The disease progresses rapidly in the acute leukaemia, whereas it progresses slowly in the chronic leukaemia. It is important to note that a chronic leukaemia may transform into acute leukaemia.


In acute leukaemias, there is failure of cell maturation and differentiation in the bone marrow. These immature leukaemic cells, known as blast cells, proliferate to replace the normal bone marrow cells. The blast cells also spill into the peripheral blood stream. Acute leukaemias are further divided into acute lymphocytic leukaemia and acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia. Acute lymphocytic leukaemia usually affects children, whereas acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia is commonly seen in adults. Recent studies have revealed that the two types of acute leukaemias, i.e. acute lymphocytic leukaemia and acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia may coexist in the same patient. Chronic leukaemia affects comparatively mature cells. Chronic leukaemias are further divided into chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

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