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1. Cancertame Ayurvedic Formulation
2. What is Chemotherapy?
3. What is Radiotherapy?
4. Role of Ayurveda in Cancer Treatment
5. Genesis of Cancer
6. Early Detection of Cancer
7. Diet, Nutrition & Cancer
8. Tobacco Smoking & Cancer
9. Conventional Treatment of Cancer
10. Soft Tissue Sarcoma
11. Mesothelioma
12. Skin Cancer
13. Bone Cancer
14. Leukaemia
15. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL)
16. Chronic Myelogenous Leukaemia (CML)
17. Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia (ALL) & Acute Non-Lymphocytic Leukaemias (ANLL)
18. Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia (AML)
19. Lymphoma
20. Multiple Myeloma
21. Breast Cancer
22. Prostate Cancer
23. Oral Cancer (Carcinoma of the Cheek, Lips & Tongue)
24. Carcinoma of the Salivary Gland
25. Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus
26. Carcinoma of Pharynx (Oropharynx, Nasopharynx and Hypopharynx)
27. Carcinoma of the Larynx
28. Brain & Spinal Cord Tumours
29. Primary Tumours of the Brain
30. Metastases in the Brain
31. Carcinoma of the Oesophagus
32. Thyroid Cancer
33. Bronchogenic Carcinoma (Lung Cancer)
34. Secondary Cancers of the Lung
35. Carcinoma of the Stomach
36. Liver Cancer
37. Gallbladder & Biliary Tract Cancer
38. Pancreatic Cancer
39. Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma and Nephroblastoma)
40. Urinary Tract (Transitional Cell Carcinoma) & Bladder Cancer
41. Carcinoma of Colon & Rectum
42. Primary Tumours of the Testis
43. Ovarian Cancer (Stromal, Germ Cell and Krukenberg's Tumour)
44. Carcinoma of Uterus
45. Cervix Cancer
46. Paediatric Cancers
47. AIDS Related Cancers
48. Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Site (CUPS)
49. Role of Nutrition in Cancer Treatment
50. Chinese Medicine in Cancer Treatment

Astrocytoma:

Astrocytoma is a primary malignant tumour of the brain that arises from the glial tissue (the supportive tissue) of the brain. Astrocytomas are classified into non-infiltrating, mildly anaplastic, moderately anaplastic and anaplastic types depending on the grade of malignancy. The non-infiltrating astrocytoma is a slow-growing tumour that does not invade the surrounding tissues. The mildly anaplastic astrocytoma and the moderately anaplastic astrocytoma grow at a comparatively faster rate and invade the adjoining tissues. The anaplastic astrocytoma grows at a very fast rate and usually presents with non-specific complaints along with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure such as dizziness, nystagmus, headache, vomiting, truncal ataxia and focal neurological signs.

Cerebellar Haemangioblastoma:

Cerebellar haemangioblastoma is a slow-growing primary tumour of the brain. It accounts for about 2 per cent of the primary brain tumours. Cerebellar haemangioblastoma has a familial tendency and appears to be associated with retinal vascular lesions, polycythaemia and hypernephroma. Cerebellar haemangioblastoma usually leads to ataxia of the trunk and the limbs. There may be signs and symptoms due to increased intracranial pressure, which include dizziness, nystagmus, headache, vomiting, truncal ataxia and focal neurological signs.

Ependymoma:

Ependymoma arises from the ependyma (the membrane lining ventricles of the brain) usually in the fourth ventricle. It is a slow-growing tumour that affects young adults. Ependymoma usually leads to raised intracranial pressure causing dizziness, nystagmus, headache, vomiting, truncal ataxia and focal neurological signs. Ependymoma may arise from the central canal of the spinal cord. Ependymoma of the spinal cord accounts for about 60 per cent of the primary tumours of the spinal cord.

Glioblastoma Multifrome:

Glioblastoma multiforme is also known as grade IV astrocytoma. It comprises about 15 per cent of the primary malignant tumours of the brain. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant and the fastest growing tumour of the brain. It usually presents with non-specific complaints and signs of electrical disturbances in the brain. There may be symptoms of raised intracranial pressure such as dizziness, nystagmus, headache, vomiting, truncal ataxia and focal neurological signs. As the tumour grows in size, there may be a focal deficit. The total surgical removal of the tumour is usually not possible.

Medulloblastoma:

Medulloblastoma comprises about 25 per cent of the intracranial tumours in children. It usually arises from the roof of the fourth ventricle. Medulloblastoma often leads to increased intracranial pressure that causes dizziness, nystagmus, headache, vomiting, truncal ataxia and focal neurological signs.

Meningioma:

Meningioma is a slow-growing tumour of the meninges (the fibrous tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord). It usually arises from the duramater and arachnoid membrane. Meningioma comprises about 20 per cent of the primary intracranial tumours. Meningioma is more common in women as compared to men. The tumour is usually encapsulated and benign in character. The incidence of meningioma increases with age. Symptoms of meningioma vary depending on the size and site of the tumour, for example, the tumour located in the sphenoidal ridge may lead to unilateral exophthalmos and that located in the olfactory groove may lead to anosmia. Meningioma usually presents with seizures, headache and focal neurological signs.

Oligodendroglioma:

Oligodendroglioma is a slow-growing tumour that mostly occurs in adults. It arises from oligodendrocytes in the cerebral hemispheres. Oligodendroglioma usually remains confined to a supratentorial region of the brain and may remain undetected for many years. Oligodendroglioma usually presents with seizures along with signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure such as dizziness, nystagmus, headache, vomiting, truncal ataxia and focal neurological signs. Calcification may be seen in about 40 per cent lesions of the oligodendroglioma.

 

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